Feeds

The land of Milk and Sammy: Free music app touted by Samsung

Ad-free streaming service to milk massive mobile market

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Seeking to capitalize on its dominance of the Android smartphone market, Samsung has launched a free online streaming music service in the US that's only available to owners of its Galaxy-branded mobes.

Just why the service is called Milk Music is hard to fathom. But it's powered by Pandora competitor Slacker Radio, it has 13 million songs in its library, and it offers more than 200 channels of music curated by "top DJs and industry pros," all delivered free of charge to Samsung customers.

There's even a "Spotlight" feature that promises selections "handpicked by music tastemakers and influencers."

"Milk Music introduces a fresh approach to music that reflects our innovation leadership and our focus on creating best-in-class consumer experiences," Gregory Lee, Samsung's North America president, said in a canned statement.

This isn't the first time that Samsung has used music as a lure for its Android phones. In 2013, the chaebol bought a million copies of Jay-Z's Magna Carta Holy Grail to give away for free via an exclusive app, making the album an instant chart-topper despite receiving mixed reviews from critics.

Screenshot of Samsung Milk Music app for Android

Turn the dial, pick your station – in the US only

For now, the South Korean firm is similarly advertising its streaming radio service as being ad-free, although the tiny type below the asterisk on its website advises us that this is only "for a limited time."

The Milk app, which is downloadable from the Google Play store beginning on Friday, uses a unique "dial" interface that lets users browse music channels by genre, and it syncs with a Samsung account so that users' preferences and listening history can be shared across multiple devices.

According to Samsung's press release, the app is officially compatible with the Galaxy S4, Galaxy SIII, Galaxy Note 3, and Galaxy Note II handsets – and it will be available on the Galaxy S5 in April – but your Reg hack was also able to install it on an older Galaxy Nexus mobe, so as they say, your mileage may vary. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.