Feeds

Delhi police forget passwords to corruption portal, ignore 600 crimes

Cops shove complaints under the rug for EIGHT YEARS

Boost IT visibility and business value

The Delhi police failed to respond to over 600 complaints forwarded to it by India’s anti-corruption agency for eight years because they couldn’t access a designated online portal.

The portal was launched in 2006 to ensure any complaints sent to the Central Vigilance Commission (CVC) regarding a particular Delhi government department, including the police, could be dealt with as expeditiously as possible by the relevant department.

However, a total of 667 police complaints were left unanswered since 2006 because of the schoolboy error, according to The Indian Express.

The issue was finally resolved in January when two officers were summoned to the CVC to explain themselves. It then emerged that the fuzz hadn’t dealt with any of the complaints for eight years because they simply didn’t know the password or how to use the portal.

After an hour-long training session, presumably to teach Delhi's finest the basics of online authentication, the password-shy cops were apparently able to access the portal and answer all outstanding complaints.

A Delhi Police officer told the paper that the force “remains committed to public grievances” but had fallen victim to a “technical problem” on this occasion.

According to the Express, the force boasted recently that it is the first on the sub-continent to handle complaints about missing objects online.

It’s unclear whether its strategy is to wait eight years before responding, by which time the complainant will have either found the object in question or forgotten what they’d lost in the first place.

Delhi’s finest will now face Japan’s National Police Agency in a competition to decide the world’s least tech savvy police force.

The NPA managed to arrest four suspects on suspicion of posting online death threats, holding one for weeks before realising their PC had in fact been infected by a remote access Trojan.

They were then led on a wild goose chase across Tokyo by the perpetrator which culminated in the arrest of a cat. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Felony charges? Harsh! Alleged Anon hackers plead guilty to misdemeanours
US judge questions harsh sentence sought by prosecutors
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?