Feeds

Putin to battle Snowden for Nobel Peace Prize

Whistleblower versus Vlad the Sabre-rattler

The essential guide to IT transformation

Russian prez Vladimir Putin and whistleblower Edward Snowden have been nominated for the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize, Reuters reports.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee met yesterday for a first shufti at the record 278 candidates for the award. Since the committee never reveals the luminaries on the list, any names which pop up in the press are a result of "either sheer guesswork or information put out by the person or persons behind the nomination".

In which case, we speculate that Bashar al-Assad put Putin's name forward, for the latter's intervention in Syria, although Russia's recent sabre-rattling in Ukraine and Crimea might have the Nobel chaps reaching for their dictionaries to check the exact meaning of "peace".

The Norwegian Nobel Institute's director, Geir Lundestad, noted: "Part of the purpose of the committee's first meeting is to take into account recent events, and committee members try to anticipate what could be the potential developments in political hotspots."

Snowden was probably nominated by Julian Assange, who may himself be under consideration for his tireless work in uncovering the truth about what US diplomats said about European politicians' personal hygiene and other such earth-shattering revelations.

Also reportedly up for the trophy are Pope Francis and Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for having the temerity to suggest girls too might benefit from an education.

The Nobel Committee will now whittle the initial nominees down to a shortlist for further processing by "adviser review", before making its decision in October.

Previous laureates include Nelson Mandela (1993), The 14th Dalai Lama (1989) and Barack Obama (2009).

Obama's win raised a few eyebrows at the time, not because he isn't undoubtedly a really nice chap and all that, but because he arguably hadn't actually done anything to merit the honour, apart from provoking a worldwide "yes we cangasm". ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
EU justice chief blasts Google on 'right to be forgotten'
Don't pretend it's a freedom of speech issue – interim commish
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report
Man at hardware store was right: name brands DO last longer
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.