Feeds

Web smut filter advisor to UK PM cuffed in 'child abuse image' probe

Officers pore over IT systems at Number 10 Downing Street

Reducing security risks from open source software

A top aide who advised British Prime Minister David Cameron on broadband internet filtering in the UK is being investigated over an allegation involving “child abuse imagery".

The man at the centre of the investigation was named last night as 62-year-old Patrick Rock, a powerful advisor to the Conservative Party for 30 years. It's understood Rock, who was deputy head of Number 10's policy unit and tipped for a peerage, was instrumental in Cameron's push for website blockades in the UK.

Rock resigned after he was arrested and quizzed by police. Cops then searched computers and other IT equipment at Number 10. A Downing Street spokesperson issued the following statement today:

On the evening of February 12th Downing Street was first made aware of a potential offence relating to child abuse imagery. It was immediately referred to the National Crime Agency (CEOP). The Prime Minister was immediately informed and kept updated throughout. Patrick Rock was arrested at his home in the early hours of February 13th, a few hours after Downing Street had reported the matter.

Subsequently, we arranged for officers to come into Number 10 have access to all IT systems and offices they considered relevant.

This is an on-going investigation so it would not be appropriate to comment further, but the Prime Minister believes that child abuse imagery is abhorrent and that anyone involved with it should be properly dealt with under the law.

The National Crime Agency's website and social network feeds are silent on the matter, as are the Prime Minister's.

We'll update as the story develops. ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.