Feeds

New FBI boss says cyber crime, not terrorism, is top of Feds' todo list

Malware cousin of fingerprint and DNA database to be shared with infosec world

Build a business case: developing custom apps

RSA 2014 The FBI's new director James Comey has told the RSA security conference in San Francisco that he is making thwarting online crime the major focus for his agency in the coming decade.

As a result, agents will shift from a reactive mode into a more forward-looking approach when tackling internet crims, by offering services with fast response times you'd expect from computers rather than their slower human builders.

For example, the FBI has been building a database of malware samples, snappily dubbed the Binary Analysis, Characterization, and Storage System (BACSS), for its investigators. Later this year a declassified version of this, dubbed Malware Investigator, will be made available to security partners, said Comey, who was sworn in as director in September.

"If a company has been hacked you can send the malware back to us and, in most cases, get a report back in hours about how it works, who it might be targeting and where we've seen it before," he told the conference today.

"Our goal is to make BACSS the same kind of repository that we have long maintained for fingerprints, criminal records and DNA."

The FBI will also expand its eGuardian program that allows companies to automatically update the agency about data security breaches involving classified and non-classified material.

Comey said he recognized there were concerns about US government intrusion into the online world, and pointed out that America itself was founded by people who were fed up with meddling rulers. But the internet is safe in the FBI's hands, he promised.

"Security has promoted liberty, there's not a tradeoff," he opined. "The men and women in the FBI are sworn to protect both, care deeply to our cores about both national security and liberty. We do not see it as a question of conflict – both those values pervade every investigation we undertake." ®

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think

More from The Register

next story
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece
Leaking sprinklers, overheated thermostats and picked locks all online
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
Plug and PREY: Hackers reprogram USB drives to silently infect PCs
BadUSB instructs gadget chips to inject key-presses, redirect net traffic and more
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?