Feeds

Young, fun and full of comely tech skills? Then BT needs you!

One-time national telco punts 1,000 new apprentice and grad jobs

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

BT is on the hunt for around 300 freshly qualified science, biz and IT graduates to work in research and development for the telecoms giant, but it might have a tough time finding enough skilled young folk to fill the posts, it has warned.

The company is hoping to recruit a further 730 bods to take on apprenticeships in engineering, software design, IT support, finance and logistics as part of its recruitment drive, which was unsurprisingly given ministerial approval from business secretary Vince Cable today. That takes the figure to 1,030 graduates.

"There’s a danger that not enough people in the UK are getting the training they need to work in research, development and innovative new industries," said BT's technology, service and operations boss Clive Selley.

He said that BT - which chucked £3.7bn at R&D over the last five years as part of its shift into direct competition with pay-TV mammoth BSkyB - would mentor and train newbies to get them up to scratch with tech such as digital media and fibre optic broadband.

The one-time national telco's chief Gavin Patterson promised that BT would additionally provide up to 1,500 short vocational training and work experience placements for unemployed 18- to 24-year-olds over the next 18 months.

“This is a tough time in the job market, with almost a million young people across the UK struggling to find work," Patterson said. "Every company needs to play its part in ensuring that Britain’s future workforce isn’t impaired by long-term unemployment."

Rival Virgin Media recently said it had employed 116 young people from its apprenticeship scheme.

In 2013, Britain's university admission service UCAS received 99,165 applications for computer sciences, of which only about one in five, or 21,710 people, were accepted onto the course.

If we take that figure as given - and set aside any flunkers from those courses - then BT is proposing to roughly scoop up nearly five per cent of the country's IT grads. ®

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup
Just hook us up to more 10Gbps ports, backbone biz yells in tit-for-tat spat
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.