Feeds

Linux-friendly Munich: Ja, we'll take open source collab cloud

14,000+ Linux and Windows clients touched

Remote control for virtualized desktops

The Linux-friendly burghers of Munich are rolling out their own open-source groupware cloud, bucking the trend for going public.

The German city has selected Kolab Desktop Client and Kolab web Client for more than 14,000 Linux PCs, surviving Windows PCs and a generation of mobile devices under a four-year project called MigMak, which has the option to be extended to eight years.

Kolab will replace a dated Sun Microsystems calendaring system.

The software will be deployed following a public tender awarded to integrator ESG.

A key part of the project will see the Kolab software running on the city’s own infrastructure and its own cloud.

The City is going against the trend, particularly in the public sector, to float one's groupware and collaboration in the cloud.

Other options would have included Google’s Gmail and Docs and Microsoft’s Office 365, neither of which were understood to have been in contention for this particular project.

Munich is understood to have gone with its own infrastructure rather than use a cloud provider’s platform because of concerns over security and of regulation – security of data, that is, and regulation of where data on its citizens can be stored.

It was Munich that in 2004 said it was ditching Microsoft on the desktop for Linux in order to assert its autonomy over its IT infrastructure under the LiMux project. Munich swapped Windows and Office for Linux and OpenOffice in a move that saw Microsoft's then chief executive Steve Ballmer interrupt a skiing holiday to personally try to lobby the city's leaders to stay with Microsoft. ®

The City decided it didn’t want to be beholden to a single IT vendor, and wanted to regain control of its IT roadmap and budgets. Munich's mayor, Christian Ude, said in 2012 the switch from Windows to Linux had saved the the city more than €4m in one year alone.

Kolab, from Swiss company Kolab Systems, was developed by the German Federal Office for Information Security (BSI). The system can be installed on premises but is also available for application service providers and ISPs to deploy.

ESG said it would take care of integration, installation, configuration, testing and consulting services during the rollout.

The integrator's customers include schools in the Swiss city of Basel, where it rolled out a web client to 35,000 PCs. It also claims an unnamed 100,000-seat rollout for an unnamed Fortune 100 company.

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
HTML5 vs native: Harry Coder and the mudblood mobile app princes
Developers just want their ideas to generate money
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.