Feeds

Nokia to Devs: PLEASE DON'T make Nokiadroid apps look like WinPho

Finns: It's '75 per cent compatible' with actual Android

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

MWC 2014 Nokia is telling developers not to make their Nokia Android apps look like Windows Phone apps.

Nokia has been explaining how much work is needed to port Android apps to its new Nokia X range, which uses the AOSP Android open source base. The Finns reckons 75 per cent of apps need no modification at all, but 25 per cent will require work. But less than a day's work, they say.

That's because Nokia intercepts Google services and replaces them with its own or Microsoft services. So calls for mapping services are redirected to a HERE maps API, Notifications to Nokia's Timeline handler, and payments to Nokia In-App Payment rather than Google Play.

The company has told developers what they need to do. Those interested will download the Android SDK and Eclipse IDE, then the Nokia X system image and then three Nokia add-ins. It's fairly straightforward - and quite similar to what BlackBerry has been doing for 18 months.

Here's how it works, according to Nokia

Which is why we mention it. Many BB10 applications today are Android ports that have gone through a very similar grinder. Android apps can be quickly ported to BB10, and also plug into a non-Google notification list, which in BlackBerry's case is the 'Hub'. Skype, LastPass and many other 'native' apps are BlackBerry ports, with the .apk binary renamed a .bar binary as a sign of compatibility. BlackBerry's dev relations team held many exhaustive "portathons" to kick start BB10 with some Android ports.

But it's been a long haul. (BlackBerry doesn't boast about it, but its pure Android runtime now allows .apk files to install and run directly in BB10 - which means its QNX-based BB10 system is more "Android compatible" than Nokia's new Android. )

What it means is that if new Nokia X customers think they're getting access to the full range of Android apps as soon as the phone is powered up, they're going to be disappointed.

Nokia has also published its user interface design guidelines, in which we found this remarkable image. Can you guess what it is?

Yes, it's advice telling Nokia developers not to make their apps look like Windows Phone apps. Yesterday, Nokia CEO Stephen Elop talked about X as "a feeder system" for Nokia's Windows Phones.

This is what it looks like! ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.