Feeds

Volvo tries to KILL SHOPPING with to-your-car Roam Delivery

Swede's invention augurs demise of mall trawls

Build a business case: developing custom apps

There are few sadder sights than a desperate-looking shopping hostage waiting outside a changing room while their partner tries on a prospective purchase.

But this sorry vista could soon become a thing of the past if Scandinavian car manufacturer Volvo has its way.

It is set to show off a new service called “Roam Delivery” at Mobile World Congress next week which should remove the need for shopping altogether. It also avoids the issue of having to wait at home for one-hour slots while your busy life flashes by.

All unhappy capitalists need do is select what stuff they want using a computer, smartphone or fondleslab. Volvo will then tell them when the delivery is ready and create a single use digital key, allowing employees access to the car for one time only.

Then, shoppers only need to park their car in a designated place, bugger off for a bit and then upon their return, the car should be heavily loaded with goods.

Klas Bendrik, group CIO at Volvo Car Group, said: “By turning the car into a pickup and drop-off zone through using digital keys we solved a lot of problems, since it’s now possible to deliver the goods to persons and not to places.

"The test customers also indicated that the service clearly saved time. And the same thing is valid for delivery companies as well, because failed first-time deliveries cost the industry an estimated €1bn in re-delivering costs. We are now further investigating the technology of digital keys and new consumer benefits linked to it."

The idea is based upon the app Volvo On Call, which allows drivers to heat or cool their car from afar, as well as performing various other functions.

At the risk of sounding churlish, the whole scheme will probably work in Scandinavia, land of saunas and sexual liberation, but might not be so great in scary old Blighty, home of street violence and car crime.

We imagine that thieves would be delighted to see an automobile packed full of gizmos. But we also imagine that shopophobics will be equally delighted to avoid having to trawl through shopping malls.

Do you think it's worth the gamble? ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.