Feeds

Google teases more cities with bonkers-fast fiber broadband rollouts

'You wouldn't steal a car! You wouldn't steal a handbag!' Well, at 10Gbps we might be able to

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Google has named nine areas in the US that could be added to its high-speed fiber internet connection service.

The ad giant said that the new markets will be considered for broadband rollouts this year, with final decisions to be taken at the end of 2014.

The nine candidates include the cities of Charlotte, NC; Nashville, TN; Salt Lake City, UT; and San Antonio, TX. Google is also examining rollouts in the metropolitan areas of Atlanta, Portland, Phoenix, San Jose, and Raleigh-Durham.

Google said that it will be working with city officials in the selected areas on possible plans and maps for Google Fiber service.

"We'll work closely with each city’s leaders on a joint planning process that will not only map out a Google Fiber network in detail, but also assess what unique local challenges we might face," Google said in announcing the new cities.

"These are such big jobs that advance planning goes a long way toward helping us stick to schedules and minimize disruption for residents."

Currently, Google has deployed its gigabit-a-second fiber in Provo, UT; Austin, TX; and the Kansas City metro area. The web king hopes to push its Fiber service to 10Gbps.

Google weighed up a number of factors in choosing the nine extra markets announced today, including the presence of incumbent providers and the willingness of local governments to work with Google to take over existing infrastructures or install new fiber lines.

While the high-speed network deployments made people in Google Fiber markets the envy of disgruntled broadband customers in other locales, the deployments have come at a cost – with cities sometimes having to foot millions of dollars in costs.

Among the targets on today's list is the greater part of what is considered Silicon Valley. Santa Clara, the surrounding cities of Mountain View, Palo Alto, and Sunnyvale are all suggested in the San Jose proposal. Google's own headquarters are located in Mountain View, though the company already operates its own high-speed network on campus, as you'd expect (let's not mention the NSA-tapped lines between its data centers).

While Austin and Provo have both emerged as hotbeds for new technology firms, a San Jose launch would bring Google Fiber's first real foray into a major tech hub. Thus far, Google has avoided traditional strongholds such as Seattle, New York and Silicon Valley in favor of smaller, emerging markets. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE accused of silencing customer gripes on social media pages
Hello. HELLO. Can EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE HEAR ME?!
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?