Feeds

Tired of arguing with suits? Get ready to argue with engineers!

And you can thank the internet of things for your new collaborators

The essential guide to IT transformation

Since time immemorial, IT professionals have been told they must serve their employers by delivering infrastructure that ensures both uninterrupted operations and delivers competitive advantage within moments of a new product or service being imagined.

The reality is rather messier, leading to endless commentary to the effect that IT has to stop being the department that says no and instead earn its keep while making chief information officers look good.

Now it looks like IT departments may be about to go through this all over again with a new stakeholder: the operations folks and engineers responsible for heavy machinery.

The reason IT professionals might be about to butt helmets with engineers is the advent of the internet of things, which is finding its way into industrial machinery. That creeping invasion has already been demonstrated to have problems, as every SCADA vulnerability demonstrates. But engineering types, Gartner research fellow Kristian Steenstrup told The Reg today, are reluctant to address problems in part because the suppliers of heavy equipment sell sealed-box products that are sold as just working. Throw in the fact such outfits aren't sufficiently mature software developers that they're tooled up for updates of their products and some heavy infrastructure can operate for years with known vulnerabilities baked in.

That's about to become scary, Steenstrup said, because enthusiasm for the internet of things means heavy infrastructure will soon come online.

Enter IT organisations, who are going to be asked to do for engineering what they've long been asked to do for the rest of a business.

This new conversation may show IT in a good light, Steenstrup said, because IT shops have better software development processes than those in operations. But IT will need to understand what engineers and operational technologists want and need, and that will mean some changes. Common security models spanning infrastructure and IT operations will soon be needed, he said, while software maintenance implementation plans may need to synchronise with plan maintenance schedules.

Gartner has devised a roadmap to help IT and engineering learn how to work together. The Reg suggested that roadmap might be called or lead to something called “EngOps” and Steenstrup smiled. Wanly. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.