Feeds

Quantum comms can be made even more secure

Digital signatures using quantum states

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Quantum mechanics can be used to create the “perfect” digital signature, but in practice, it's held back by the technical impossibility of retaining quantum states for more than a few seconds. Now, a group of researchers from the UK, Croatia and Greece is proposing a scheme they say would make quantum digital signatures (QDS) not just feasible, but usable.

The Achilles heel of QDS is that it depends on persistent quantum memory, they say, and this means real-world implementations wouldn't happen for years.

In a paper published in Physical Review Letters and also available at Arxiv, the researchers propose a scheme that allows the distribution of quantum digital signatures, but eliminates the need for quantum memory.

Instead, they say, their QDS works with today's linear optics.

“In a generic QDS protocol, the sender sends pairs of quantum states, quantum signatures, to the multiple recipients. The recipients store the signatures in quantum memory until the sender decides to send a particular message,” they write.

Using quantum states as the signatures ensures authenticity and nonrepudiability of the messages, but since a message might need to be verified years after its creation, current QDS schemes assume there's some way to store the signatures indefinitely – which there isn't.

“This is a serious shortcoming given that state-of-the-art quantum memories cannot achieve coherence times longer than minutes,” they write.

What the researchers propose is that the quantum states representing the signature information be converted to classical information using quantum measurements – and what the users store is the classical information representing the signature.

The researchers also note that the kinds of communication systems already used in commercial quantum key distribution (QKD) schemes could represent a practical way to implement their QDS protocol for experiments.

The paper was authored by Vedran Dunjko, Petros Wallden and Erika Andersson. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.