Feeds

FireEye enters crowded IPS market

More signal, less noise

Reducing security risks from open source software

Late last week, FireEye took something of a plunge, throwing its hat into the ring of the crowded intrusion prevention system (IPS) market, with a beta of software that adds IPS capability to its virtualised MVX environment.

With the IPS to be made available as a license add-on for the company's NX network threat prevention system in the first half of this year, The Register spoke to the company's APAC CTO Bryce Boland about the release.

In explaining the decision to enter such a contested market, Boland said FireEye hopes to differentiate itself by being less noisy than today's IPS.

“Intrusion prevention systems generate thousands of alerts,” he said. That degrades the value of the IPS, he argued, because after implementation, the next thing the customer needs to do is spend money on ways to filter those alerts and try to eliminate false positives.

Those false positives, he said, are intrinsic to technologies looking at signatures: for example, a text string passing over the network that matches an attack signature can trigger an alarm, even if the traffic is benign.

“So we're using the MVX technology to try and see if there's a real risk attached to an alert, and reduce the signal-to-noise ratio”, he said.

What happens in the FireEye environment, he explained, is that instead of passing a “hit” directly to the alert management system, “we take that information and play it in the MVX environment.”

That's then integrated with the host-based detection FireEye acquired when it bought Mandiant, and integrated into its platform.

“When we detect an attack at the network level, we can pare out all the indicators of a compromise. Then we can send that to the endpoint solution, and identify any host on the corporate network that may have been compromised by the attack,” he said.

That extends to any systems that have the host-based protection installed – including machines connecting from outside the corporate network, he added.

The aim, Boland said, is to get attacks detected in minutes, so that the threat's impact can be minimised.

FireEye's full announcement is here. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Microsoft: You NEED bad passwords and should re-use them a lot
Dirty QWERTY a perfect P@ssword1 for garbage websites
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
L33t haxxors compete to p0wn popular home routers
EFF-endorsed SOHOpelessly Broken challenge will air routers' dirty zero day laundry
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.