Feeds

Samsung flings sueball at Dyson for 'intolerable' IP copycat claim

Outraged Koreans seek TEN BILLION compo for 'hurt image'

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Update Samsung is looking for 10 billion won ($9.43m) in compensation from Dyson after the vacuum maker dropped its patent lawsuit against the Korean firm.

Dyson DC37 vacuum cleaners

The chaebol is claiming that the IP litigation over its MotionSync range of hoovers damaged its corporate image.

Dyson filed the suit with the UK High Court in September last year, alleging that the steering mechanism on MotionSync vacuums was a direct copy of two of its models. But the company voluntarily dropped the suit three months later.

A Samsung spokesperson told The Korea Times that the firm had filed against Dyson in the Seoul Central District Court because the British company's accusation that Sammy was a serial patent violator hurt its image.

“We are initially seeking ten billion won compensation from the UK-based manufacturer, however, the amount will increase depending on how the court proceedings go,” they said.

“Samsung’s marketing activities were negatively affected by Dyson’s groundless litigation, which is intolerable.” ®

Update

Dyson contacted The Reg just after publication to tell us:

Dyson pioneered cyclonic vacuum cleaners and digital motors – and has been developing them ever since. We patent our technology, and naturally defend it. It is surprising that a company over 100 times bigger than Dyson is so worried. The patent system offers us some protection but not enough: with an army of lawyers, hidden prior art is occasionally found and ways to design around existing patents identified.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.