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Microsoft, Oracle name the date to consummate Azure deal

Big Red is really, actually, going on sale in Redmond's cloud on March 12th

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Microsoft has written to Oracle-on-Azure users, letting them know that as of March 12th they'll be paying for the Oracle bits of it.

Oracle's database, the WebLogic Server and Java development have been available on Azure since September 2013, when the two software titans delivered on their June 2013 announcement of a cloudy détente. The announcement of the deal was extraordinary: Microsoft and Oracle have seldom been on cordial terms, so it was taken as a sign of AWS-inspired desperation that the two played together nicely. Realising the agreement with actual services saw us wheel out the sub-heading “'Hell frozen', report flying pigs”.

The Reg has now learned that things are going so well the Oracle-on-Azure service will reach the milestone of General Availability on March 12th. Evidence for that news can be found in this email sent to Azure customers that says “Windows-based Oracle software images will become generally available on March 12, 2014.” Thanks to @amaclach for the directions to the mail.

The change in status means customers will be paying Oracle for licences, and paying Microsoft for the Azure resources they consume.

Attaining the status of General Availability suggests both Microsoft and Oracle are satisfied the service is so solid they're willing to be sued if they miss their service level agreements, good news for both companies' clients as it gives them another way to consume their preferred software and operating system combination. The new status is also sure to attract attention from Google and AWS, who can't quite match the cloudy Oracle rigs Azure now offers.

It's not all sweetness and light, as the email we've linked to outlines myriad licensing changes that represent many traps for the unwary. As the email is of the “Click here to view this as a web page” variety, we've popped a copy here so you can read the details in case the message escaped your inbox. Or just to satisfy your curiosity. ®

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