Feeds

Google hefts MySQL service into cloud

MySQL for the punters, but for everything else there's MariaDB

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Google has pushed its MySQL-based cloud database service into general availability, months after beginning a wholesale shift of internal production servers to MariaDB.

The new service encrypts customer data, supports databases up to 500GB in size, and has a 99.95 percent uptime service-level agreement, the company announced on Tuesday.

Prices for the underlying infrastructure range from $0.36 per day up to $46.84 per day, depending on the gear on which admins choose to run the databases.

This compares with the somewhat more expensive offering from chief rival Amazon Web Services, whose Relational Database Service costs from $0.60 to $113.40 per day with further discounts if you reserve gear for between a year and three years, or Microsoft's Windows Azure which starts at as little as $0.16 per day and goes up from there.

As canny readers may be able to infer, figuring out how to price different cloud services against one another is difficult, since each provider uses a different unit of time to price their services, and each service will wrap-in other underlying infrastructure costs and leave out others.

For Google's system, customer data is automatically replicated into multiple data centers in multiple zones, giving users greater redundancy in case some of Google's data centers are stomped by Godzilla have problems. Additionally, the service automates patch management, backups, and administration of the systems, as well. Cloud SQL is regularly patched to keep it in sync with version 5.5 of MySQL, we understand.

"The most common use cases are when developers are looking for standard MySQL databases but don't want to do much of the leg work," a Google spokesperson told us.

Though Google has based Cloud SQL on MySQL, the company is itself moving over a thousand internal production servers off of MySQL and to rival system MariaDB.

At the time of writing, Google had not responded to a question from us on why it was continuing to maintain MySQL alongside MariaDB, when either can stand in for the other. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.