Feeds

Apple in bid to turn MORE and MORE humans into iPhone-stroking fanbois

New production facility offers iPhones on an epic scale

High performance access to file storage

Apple's new sapphire glass production facility in Arizona will contain enough machinery to make 100 million iPhone screens, it has been claimed.

It was estimated back in October last year that over 421 million iPhones have been sold since the product was launched in 2007.

If the estimate about the new Arizona factory is correct, it would mean the fruity firm has enough production clout to make screens for another 100 million more, thus bringing an increasing number of those wealthy enough to pay for the Apple smartphone into the fold. Add the recently inked deal with mega network China Mobile and its potential multi-million user market, and that's a LOT of new fanbois.

According to 9to5Mac, Apple and its partner GT Advanced have ordered several sapphire furnaces for the factory in Mesa, Arizona.

Import and export records show that that GT Advanced has ordered two shipments of Intego Sirius Sapphire Display Inspection Tools, which can be used to make high quality sapphire glass.

It has long been speculated that the fruity firm will use this material to make the next iPhone model.

According to documents obtained by 9to5Mac, Apple and GT will use sapphire in "new market segments such as cover screens for smartphones and mobile devices".

"The machines will allow GT Advanced to ensure that the sapphire crystal displays meet high-quality standards," the document said. "These machines are specific for display-grade components, not small pieces of sapphire that could be used for Home buttons or cameras."

A recent SEC filing suggests that all GT's work will be exclusively for Apple.

The next iPhone is rumoured to have a larger screen and could possibly be curved, although Apple plays its future plans very close to its chest. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Feast your PUNY eyes on highest resolution phone display EVER
Too much pixel dust for your strained eyeballs to handle
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS
'Well, that 5c experiment didn't go so well – let's try the other direction'
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Nvidia gamers hit trifecta with driver, optimizer, and mobile upgrades
Li'l Shield moves up to Android 4.4.2 KitKat, GameStream comes to notebooks
AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'
The Radeon R9 295X2: Water-cooled, 5,632 stream processors, 11.5TFLOPS
Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper
The perils of having Panasonic as a partner
NORKS' own smartmobe pegged as Chinese landfill Android
Fake kit in the hermit kingdom? That's just Kim Jong-un-believable!
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.