Feeds

Democrats introduce net neutrality legislation in Senate and House

Open Internet Preservation Act would halt website pricing

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

In a coordinated move, Congressional Democrats have introduced legislation in the Senate and House of Representatives to enshrine network neutrality principles in law until the Federal Communications Commission rules on the matter.

"This bill ensures that consumers, not their Internet service provider, are in the driver's seat when it comes to their online experience," said the House bill's cosponsor, Representative Anna Eshoo (D-CA).

"The free and open Internet has been a pillar of our country's growing economy, unparalleled technological innovation, and even global social movements. It is the backbone of our digital world, and I intend to keep it that way."

H.R. 3982, or the Open Internet Preservation Act, is a simple two-page bill which states that the FCC's previous ruling on net neutrality stays in operation. The bill follows last month's court ruling that the FCC wasn't entitled to block telecommunications companies from giving differing priorities to internet traffic.

The bill doesn't dictate exactly what net neutrality rules should be enforced, nor change the responsibilities of the FCC. It will only remain in force until the FCC has set out new neutrality standards, a move the agency's chairman has pledged to sort out.

"Keeping the Internet free from gatekeeper control is essential to ensuring consumers have access to the content, websites and services of their choice," said Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), who helped put corresponding legislation before the Senate.

"Until the DC Circuit Court's recent decision, broadband companies had been barred from blocking content they dislike or holding innovative new services hostage for higher and higher tolls. This bill would reinstate principles of choice and freedom on the Internet and protect consumers and entrepreneurs."

President Obama has said he supports net neutrality legislation, and the bill is likely to pass in the majority-Democratic Senate with little problems. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives is, however, highly unlikely to pass the bill as it stands. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
US Social Security 'wasted $300 million on an IT BOONDOGGLE'
Scrutiny committee bods probe derailed database project
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.