Feeds

Japanese quantum boffins 'may have the key to TELEPORTATION'

Energy-moving experiment 'cheats' quantum theory with startlingly lateral idea

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Don't get too excited, the world's not about to get Star Trek-style transporters. However, if a quantum communications theory formulated by three Tohoku University boffins can stand the test of experiment, they could break the distance limitations that currently constrain quantum communications.

At this point, the exercise gets a little mind-bending, even in the abstract of the paper by Masahiro Hotta, Jiro Matsumoto and Go Yusa from Tohoku's Department of Physics: “We prove that introducing squeezed vacuum states with local vacuum regions between the two protocol users overcomes this limitation, allowing energy teleportation over practical distances”.

“Squeezed states” describe a way to cheat quantum theory just a little bit: you reduce the uncertainty of one parameter in the quantum system by increasing the uncertainty of another parameter. Think of (for example) light. Light has two polarisation states – “squeezing” would allow measurements of the horizontal polarisation state to be more accurate, so long as you don't mind more uncertainty within the vertical polarisation state.

One practical example of squeezing was explained to The Register here, where it was being used to improve the sensitivity of a gravity wave observatory.

So, what's this got to do with quantum communication? It boils down to physicists' ability to demonstrate Quantum Energy Teleportation (QET) over a distance, since as the authors write: “despite … experimental proposals for various physical systems, a strong distance limitation has hampered experimental verification”.

Squeezed Quantum States for Teleportation

Squeezing the quantum state to get better measurements of teleportation

The Tokohu paper proposes a QET protocol that uses “a squeezed vacuum state” between two ends of the communication: “The spatial correlation of the quantum fluctuations with zero energy is maintained, even if the distance between the sender and receiver of QET is very large,” they write. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.