Feeds

Philippine govt to hacktivists: Please don't hit your shiny new site

New hi-tech anti-hack plan launched into action

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

The Philippine government has come up with a novel approach to combatting the hacktivist threat: ask any cyber ne’er-do-wells politely but firmly to stay away from their web sites.

The call came on Monday at a press briefing to discuss the government’s new open data initiative.

Open Data Philippines was launched by president Aquino’s administration in an attempt to "institutionalise open, transparent, accountable and participatory governance by providing Filipinos with accessible, understandable and shareable government data”, according to a video explaining the launch.

However, possibly fearing a public backlash, presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda appealed to hackers not to attack the site.

“We would like to ask those who would like to deface this Open Data Philippines, it is a step towards transparency and accountability … Sana huwag naman (We hope they won’t attack it),” he said, according to a presidential press release.

Local site Rappler, who attended the press briefing, had more:

“Open Data is your data. This is the public’s data about you, so I don’t think it’s in the interest of the Filipinos to damage the information that we have,” Lacierda apparently said.

“This instrument is intended to make more intelligent and more participative and to make the Filipino public partners in governance.”

The government’s fears of hacktivist retribution are partially justified.

In November last year several federal and local government web sites were defaced by hackers claiming affiliation with Anonymous, in an attempt to garner support for a demonstration against lawmakers' alleged misuse of public money.

A few months previously an Anonymous hacker published what he claimed to be three telephone numbers belonging to Aquino in a bid to urge voters to confront their leader directly.

Local hacktivists have also taken to the internet to wage war on Malaysian sites after a bloody territorial battle in the east Malaysian state of Sabah, and to deface Chinese sites after a dispute between the countries in the South China Sea. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Judge halts spread of zombie Nortel patents to Texas in Google trial
Epic Rockstar patent war to be waged in California
German space centre endures cyber attack
Chinese code retrieved but NSA hack not ruled out
APPLE FAILS to ditch class action suit over ebook PRICE-FIX fiasco
Do not pass go, do cough (up to) $840m in damages
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.