Feeds

LogMeIn: We're stopping our free offering from, errrm, NOW

Tick-tock: Remote access app euthanised overnight

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Angry users of the free version of LogMeIn have reacted furiously to plans to turn the remote desktop access service into a paid subscription product.

After 10 years of providing a free service, LogMeIn today announced that it would start charging people to use a new beefed-up version of its software.

Starting from today, LogMeIn customers will be told they have seven days from their next login to upgrade to a paid version.

"This product will be a paid-only offering, and it will offer what we believe to be the best premium desktop, cloud and mobile access experience available on the market today," a LogMeIn spokesman said.

Despite promises that "subscriptions will include LogMeIn’s signature remote access to two or more computers, premium mobile apps for Android and iOS, and native Mac and Windows desktop apps", users of the free version were raging.

Here's what one Reg reader had to say about the changes:

Okay, so it's generous of them to offer 50 percent off a subscription for controlling two of the eight or so PCs I have previously shepherded, and the tools are great, but I really don't appreciate being given less than 24 hours notice. The only real choice I have is to hear the click of the loaded revolver being held to my cranium and pony up for a year's subscription for the two that really matter, in order to have time to come up with another approach that I can afford.

He continued: "Now I know this could come across as 'freetard whinges as profit-making entity takes away his free toys' - I prefer to think of it as 'hopelessly addicted cracktard's free supply dries up as dealer hits him for national debt of a small Eastern European republic to pay for next fix'. Nice one, LogMeIn. You could have just asked nicely for a reasonable amount of money for a domestic user."

Bizarrely, LogMeIn tweeted a quote from Martin Luther King just a few hours before it prepared to enrage its users:

Here's what the rest of Twitter had to say about the death of LogMeInFree:

No doubt you're annoyed too, dear reader. Rage away in the comments. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.