Feeds

MPAA spots a Google Glass guy in cinema, calls HOMELAND SECURITY

Unleashing the Feds on suspected pirates is standard procedure, we're assured

Security for virtualized datacentres

An Ohio man is crying foul after he was detained and interrogated by the feds – because he wore a Google Glass headset in a movie theater.

The bloke, who wishes to remain anonymous, said he was pulled from a screening of Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit at the AMC Easton Town Center in Columbus by men who he claims identified themselves as US government agents.

After being told to step outside the theater, he was accused of using the Google Glass headset to record and pirate the film.

The chap, who uses the camera-fitted wearable computer with prescription lenses, told the agents that he was not recording the flick and did not have any footage from the theater stored on the head-mounted gadget. It was only after the g-men connected the headset to a laptop and searched its stored media – of his wife and dog, apparently - that the man was allowed to go on his way.

Though the fella said he wasn't sure at the time who exactly detained him in the mall office, he later identified the agents as employees of US Department of Homeland Security and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) which represents the top six Hollywood studios.

It's understood an MPAA representative was at the AMC, spotted the Google Glass wearer, and tipped off the feds.

"They wanted to know who I am, where I live, where I work, how much I’m making, how many computers I have at home, why am I recording the movie, who am I going to give the recording to, why don’t I just give up the guy up the chain, ’cause they are not interested in me. Over and over and over again," the headset owner claimed to tech blog The Gadgeteer.

The MPAA confirmed to The Register that it did, in fact, investigate the Glass-wearing chap at the Columbus theater.

"Google Glass is an incredible innovation in the mobile sphere, and we have seen no proof that it is currently a significant threat that could result in content theft," the MPAA said in a statement.

"The MPAA works closely with theaters all over the country to curb camcording and theater-originated piracy, and in this particular case, no such activity was discovered."

The US Department of Homeland Security polices piracy through its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) branch and the National Intellectual Property Rights Center. The office works with movie studios and cinemas to stop the reproduction and distribution of pirated films.

"On January 18, special agents with ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations and local authorities briefly interviewed a man suspected of using an electronic recording device to record a film at an AMC theater in Columbus," Khaalid Walls, an ICE spokesman, told a reporter at the Columbus Dispatch. "The man, who voluntarily answered questions, confirmed to authorities that the suspected recording device was also a pair of prescription eye glasses in which the recording function had been inactive. No further action was taken."

Ryan Noonan, an AMC spokesman, told the newspaper: "While we’re huge fans of technology and innovation, wearing a device that has the capability to record video is not appropriate at the movie theater." ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.