Feeds

NTT DoCoMo says two mobe OSes are enough, so sayonara to Tizen

March launch for Linux-powered phone OS put on indefinite hold

3 Big data security analytics techniques

The open-source Tizen mobile OS has suffered another setback, with Japanese mobile giant NTT DoCoMo announcing that it has put off plans to launch a smartphone powered by the system this year.

The carrier had earlier said that it would launch a Tizen device in March. But according to a report in the Wall Street Journal on Friday, a DoCoMo spokesman has said that it has shelved those plans for now.

"The market is not big enough to support three operating systems at this time," DoCoMo's So Hiroki reportedly said, citing research from IDC Japan showing only 2.2 per cent growth in the Japanese smartphone market for the April-to-September period.

The other two operating systems to which Hiroki refers are, of course, Android and iOS, which together account for 99.1 per cent of the Japanese smartphone market, according to the latest figures from Kantar Worldpanel.

Had DoCoMo gone ahead with its plans, it would have been the first carrier in the world to offer a Tizen phone. Although some reference devices have been distributed to developers, the Linux-based OS has yet to ship on any commercially available handset.

Just which vendor would supply the Tizen phone that DoCoMo intended to sell has never been confirmed, but Samsung was always the most likely culprit, being one of the platform's biggest supporters. (Those Tizen developer phones were made by Samsung, too.)

But Samsung seems to have encountered some stumbling blocks of its own. Last January it announced that "more than one" Tizen-powered handset would debut in 2013. In the end, none did.

Earlier this month, the Korean firm said it would publish release dates for its Tizen kit ahead of this year's Mobile World Congress in February, but so far this just sounds like a repeat of last year's announcement.

Whatever hold-ups are keeping Samsung from shipping its Tizen devices have forced its carrier partners to adjust their plans, too. At the Tizen Developer Conference last March, NTT DoCoMo said it would ship its first Tizen-based phone in the second half of 2013. That obviously didn't happen, and now it's unclear whether it ever will.

At the time, French telecoms giant Orange was said to be the second carrier in line to offer Tizen devices. But in November, the company's device boss Yves Maitre said that it, too, had postponed its plans indefinitely while it "reassesses its strategy."

What all of this means for Tizen's future isn't clear. But unlike NTT DoCoMo, Orange maintains that it's still intent on creating more competition for Android and iOS in the smartphone market – a sentiment that was often repeated during last year's developer conference. And even DoCoMo says it will still work on Tizen devices, despite having no immediate plans to sell them.

Still, with Firefox OS and Jolla's Sailfish already having launched to somewhat muted reception from consumers, and with Ubuntu Phone still in the works, the window of opportunity for yet another Linux-based mobile OS appears to be narrowing. Unless Samsung and the other Tizen contributors can ship a mobile platform that's truly extraordinary, DoCoMo's decision to hold off may prove to be a wise one. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.