Feeds

Sniff, sniff, what's that burning smell? Oh, it's Google's patent-filing office working flat out

Nearly 2,000 patents granted to the ad giant in 2013

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Google, perhaps as sick as we are of the ongoing patent wars, spent last year furiously filling its technology war chest – with new designs rubber-stamped by the US patent office, according to research published by The Financial Times.

The study, syndicated by The Australian Financial Review here, was created by patent tracker IFI. It claims Google was in 21st place in 2012 in terms of patents issued in the US, and didn't even make the top 50 in 2011.

But then in 2013, the IFI says, Google banked 1,920 patents, enough to place it in the US top 10 when compared to the 2012 list, here. The Chocolate Factory would still have to double its output to get close to top-of-the-table patent recipients IBM (6,478 in 2012) and Samsung (5,081).

Forgive us for suggesting that Google hopes to emerge victorious from the smartphone patent omnishambles by defensively protecting its technology, and at a rate not seen before from the company.

And that's probably because the greater Android's success, the more reason Apple and Microsoft have to continue their lawsuits. Indeed, scanning even the first 50 search results at the US Patent Office shows reasonable activity in the mobile space.

That fifty also includes what look to the untrained eye like “troll” filings: e-commerce enabled advertising, email conversation management, advertising with audio content and so on. To be fair, however, there are also "core business" patents there, covering search and cloud computing operations.

The FT notes that as well as bolstering its “weak” position in the smartphone patent market, Google's awarded patents also reflect its enthusiasm for the wearable business.

Google's chief patent lawyer Allen Lo also nominated robotics patents as a priority in discussion with the FT, saying the company had learned from the smartphone litigation and wanted to “avoid a war” in its new markets. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off
Cellphone baseband device biz shuttered
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Amazon says Hachette should lower ebook prices, pay authors more
Oh yeah ... and a 30% cut for Amazon to seal the deal
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.