Feeds

Oracle picks PCIe flash from LSI for flashy next-gen Exadata box

Meanwhile, buyout by Avago still on track

Security for virtualized datacentres

Oracle, a minor database and enterprise software interest of yachtsman Larry Ellison, has picked LSI to supply PCIe flash acceleration cards.

LSI’s Nytro-branded cards will be used in Oracle’s Exadata X4 engineered system, what it calls its next-generation Database Machine. The cards have a jointly-developed Oracle LSI software technology called Dynamic Logical Capacity (DLC) which is claimed to “extend the logical flash storage capacity of Exadata beyond the system’s physical flash capacity.”

Oracle Exadata systems SVP Juan Loiaza said: “Flash-based storage is a key element of Exadata, and LSI Nytro flash accelerator cards deliver the performance and reliability that Oracle demands for Exadata. The expanded flash capacity enabled by DLC technology further enhances cost-effectiveness, raising the value we’re able to deliver to customers.”

There is no information about DLC on LSI’s web site. It sounds like some form of paging mechanism between the flash card and disk … maybe, but what’s new about that? We’re trying to find out more.

Nice win for LSI on the PCIe flash card front. As a reminder, LSI is being bought by Avago for $6.6bn cash. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.