Feeds

Ten classic electronic calculators from the 1970s and 1980s

Lo-tech delights for button-pushers worldwide

Security for virtualized datacentres

Casio FX-81 (1981)

Reg Hardware retro numbers

The cream coloured FX-81 and its close relative, the FX-82, were almost ubiquitous in schoolrooms in the early to mid-1980s, whether you were in the O-level or the CSE (Certificate of Secondary Education) streams.

Casio FX-81

With an eight-digit LCD display and a chunky top end that held the two AA batteries, these were solid school maths workhorses. Casio churned out millions of these and of similar looking models, including some for other people - the Boots 527 scientific calculator was a Casio FX-7 with a different badge on it. If you were a bit of a swot, you might go instead for the FX-100, with those all-important extra two digits.

Casio FX-550 (1981)

Reg Hardware retro numbers

In the early 1980s, calculators were booming, but so were concerns about what they’d mean for numeracy – and for maths exams. Within a few years, most examination boards would be allowing people to use calculators for O levels and for CSEs. If you were heading for A level Maths or Physics, though, a humble FX-81 wouldn’t cut it.

You wanted something with ten digits of precision, and plenty of functions for statistics and trigonometry. The FX-550 had all of those - and even a random number generator. A slim, metal-clad model that came with a flip-cover plastic wallet, the FX-550 saw countless students through their exams and into university.

It didn’t have the programmable functions of some fancier models, but for many of us in the 1980s, this and similar models were an essential tool at school or college.

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.