Feeds

Alicia Keys throws in towel on BlackBerry's creative director job

Chanteuse ditches dying handset maker - or did they ditch her?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

She's the indecisive pop star who sung about constantly "falling in and out of love" with some bloke or other.

Now the caterwauling piano player Alicia Keys has made a concrete decision, for once in her life, and has stepped down from her role as BlackBerry's global creative director.

She started the role last year, when the firm formerly known as RIM launched its new BlackBerry 10 devices in a bid to compete with Apple and other smartphone manufacturers. However, the phones flopped and a subsequent attempt to sell off the firm failed dismally.

It is unclear whether Keys decided that the job wasn't for her, or whether the ailing Blackberry manufacturer decided they could no longer afford her.

"We have enjoyed the opportunity to work with such an incredibly talented and passionate individual," BlackBerry said in a statement.

BlackBerry phones were once so fashionable that hard-working execs addicted to the ungainly mobes referred to them as “crackberries” while gangs of London youths were alleged to have used the phones, and their killer BBM platform - to organise the London riots of 2011. Since those heady days, however, the brand has nosedived in popularity.

At the end of 2013, BlackBerry - which used to be known as Research In Motion - was forced to make a $4.4bn writedown after profits plummeted by $2.7bn on the previous year.

Keys' career, on the other hand, has remained steadfastly successful. Her last album, Girl On Fire, went to number one in the US and number 13 in the UK, a nation known for its superior musical taste.

During her time at BlackBerry, Key organised a scholarship scheme to encourage women to study STEM subjects. She also ran the Keep Moving project, which helped the public collaborate with artists and filmmakers. ®

Bootnote

Regular Reg readers will recall that Justin Bieber tried to bag himself a $200k RIM job - and got turned down because, according to RIM execs, “he's not going to last”.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
Here's your chance to buy an ancient, working APPLE ONE
Warning: Likely to cost a lot even for a Mac
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.