Feeds

ITU signs off network spec for personal medical devices

Cisco, IBM, Oracle, Intel, Qualcomm et al can now run your body

Business security measures using SSL

The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has signed off a new standard for communication between personal medical devices.

It will come as no surprise to learn that Intel, Cisco, IBM, Oracle, several consumer electronics giants and the industry groups behind WiFi, Bluetooth and Zigbee are behind the new standard, as they are all members of the Continua Health Alliance.

The ITU's “ITU-T H.810” standard “contains” the Alliance's “Interoperability design guidelines for personal health systems”.

The guidelines are designed to allow easy interoperability between all manner of personal health devices such as “wireless blood pressure cuffs, weight scales and a wide range of activity trackers”. Once such gadgets have a common standard to code to, it is expected it will become easier for them to interoperate so their output can be consumed by other devices, or uploaded into clinical systems that track health.

The standard offers five interfaces, namely:

  • TAN-IF: Interface between touch area network (TAN) health devices and application hosting devices (AHDs)
  • PAN-IF: Interface between personal area network (PAN) health devices and AHDs
  • LAN-IF: Interface between local area network (LAN) health devices and AHDs
  • WAN-IF: Interface between AHDs and wide area network (WAN) health devices
  • HRN-IF: Interface between WAN health devices and Health Record Network health devices

Ratification by the ITU will of course help the Alliance's members to sell stuff, because once a standard like this gets up anyone working with different technology finds it much harder to stay relevant.

And as the president and chair of the Continua Health Alliance, Clint McClellan (day job: Qualcomm) says in the canned statement about the new standard, signoff for the standard ”will further stimulate … global adoption, improving device interoperability and paving the way for complementary e-health standards.”

You read that right: the consortium expects other standards will flow from the ratification of this networking spec.

What's in the standard? It's hard to say because the documents are only accessible to those working on the effort. But this ITU page lists the other standards ITU-T H.810 relies on and suggests it encapsulates a laundry list of wireless and messaging standards. ®

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts
After Applelocalypse, other wristputers will get stuck in
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.