Feeds

Australian Technologies curriculum to be published but not endorsed in Jan 2014

Government's Curriculum Review to assess if coding-for-kids plan is among 'world's best'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Implementation of Australia's Technologies curriculum, including the Digital Technologies stream that represents the nation's first attempt to put computational thinking in the classroom from Kindergarten to Year 10, is almost certainly on the back burner for several months.

The Reg learned of the delay last Tuesday when we spotted the fact that The Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) had changed its timetable for publication of the curriculum. Spokes-entities from the federal Department of Education explained the delay by telling us that “The Australian Standing Council for School decided not to “endorse the curriculum as final, given that the Australian Government is preparing to undertake a Review of the Australian Curriculum."

ACARA has today told us that “The Ministers agreed to the noted curriculum being made available for states and territories. So while it was noted, not endorsed, we are able to make it available through publication. We intend to do that in January 2014, making it clear that it is waiting endorsement from Ministers.”

In other words, the curriculum won't be signed off.

And it will still be subject to the federal government's planned review of the national curriculum, which the federal department of education today told us “is expected to be completed in 2014.”

That review, we have been told “will look at the balance, breadth and suitability of the Australian Curriculum. The Government is committed to ensuring that the curriculum which is finally endorsed meets student needs and parents’ expectations.”

We asked the department why, given the Digital Technologies Curriculum has broad industry support and has been suggested as a key economic development initiative, it is appropriate to further delay the introduction of this material to Australian schools.

The department's response is as follows:

“The Government wants the Australian Curriculum for Technologies to be the best it can be. While there has been broad consultation, the Government believes that the curriculum can still be improved. To that end it is appropriate to undertake the Review and listen to what the experts have to say. That way, we can ensure that the Australian Curriculum can be benchmarked against the world’s best.”

Vulture South takes that to mean a re-write is entirely possible.

Australia's States and Territories have considerable independence in what they choose to teach and can devise their own curricula. The Reg imagines that with the Technologies Curriculum left without ministerial endorsement, few if any will rush to implement it.

This state of affairs means years of effort to develop a Digital Technologies curriculum aimed at meeting industry's oft-stated need for a more-skilled workforce has been put on the back burner, possibly for more than a year. As we've pointed out in the past, even if the Digital Technologies curriculum is adopted as rapidly as is possible it will be 2030 before the first school-leavers with an education permeated by computational thinking arrive in the workforce or tertiary education.

Further time spent refining the curriculum will push that date further into the future, an interesting outcome for a nation that says it understands the need to diversify its economy. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.