Feeds

Relax, Obama! Former Microsoft exec tapped to save sick healthcare.gov

Ex-Office Group prez to succeed the Prez's man

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Obama administration has apointed a former Microsoft executive to be the new head of its troubled Healthcare.gov website.

On Tuesday, US Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius said that Kurt DelBene, who most recently served as president of the Microsoft Office division, would become the new manager of the Obamacare portal.

DelBene, a 21-year Microsoft veteran, announced his retirement from the company in July and served his last day in Redmond on December 13.

In his new role with Healthcare.gov, he will succeed Jeff Zients, President Obama's handpicked fixer, who has only been involved with the site since late October. Zients, a political insider, came to the job with little tech background but a history of streamlining ineffective government projects. He is due to become head of the National Economic Council and the President's top economic aide early next year.

That will leave DelBene with the unenviable task of rejuvenating Healthcare.gov, the broken website that has become an albatross for the President's landmark healthcare reform efforts.

"The President and I believe strongly in having one person, with strong experience and expertise in management and execution, who is thinking 24/7 about HealthCare.gov," Sebelius said. "Kurt's leadership and management of HealthCare.gov will be in consultation with [Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services] Administrator Marilyn Tavenner and in partnership with the project's general contractor, QSSI."

DelBene will pursue plans already in place for Healthcare.gov, Sibelius said, with an increased emphasis on improving the site's stability, redundancy, and traffic capacity – all areas where it has suffered, so far – not to mention bolstering its security and assuring the privacy of its users.

He has his work cut out for him. The current "open enrollment" period, during which Americans can sign up for health coverage starting in 2014, ends on March 31, and traffic to the site is likely to increase steadily until then.

Sebelius said DelBene has committed to managing Healthcare.gov through at least the first half of 2014. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Right to be forgotten should apply to Google.com too: EU
And hey - no need to tell the website you've de-listed. That'll make it easier ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.