Feeds

No anon pr0n for you: BT's network-level 'smut' filters will catch proxy servers too

We said anon in the headline, not the naughty word, you perv

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

BT's new network-level nudie no-no filter system will block access to sites promoting proxies and anonymisers, The Register has learned.

However, the one-time national telco has insisted that it won't choke VPN connections over its network now that its Parental Controls service, using DNS lookup technology, is in place.

On Friday, BT flicked the switch on its promised system to supposedly help to protect kids in the UK from sex/drugs/violence/etc online, in the hope of preventing regulatory meddling from Whitehall.

New subscribers will be forced to opt-out of BT's censorship machine, while existing customers will be nagged to switch on the system early next year.

Redwood, California-based Nominum, whose chief scientist is Paul Mockapetris - inventor of the Domain Name System - is helping to "determine which content to block," a BT spokesman told El Reg.

"The categorisations are constantly updated to keep pace with the evolving content on the internet," he added.

Parental Controls, we're told, will not be applied to connections made over Virtual Private Networks. But, here's the fun bit:

The filter "doesn't block VPN connections, but does prevent access to sites promoting the use of proxies and annonymisers [sic]," the BT spokesman said.

Some IP addresses will be blocked "where required", he added, which we presume relates to - among other things - court orders that demand ISPs to block access to sites serving up links and torrents to copyrighted material, even though there are obvious workarounds.

Rights-holders in Britain can now use legislation to force telcos to filter out sites that infringe their copyright, following a landmark ruling in 2011. They can also regularly dictate to ISPs what IP addresses and URLs should be blocked, as well as including on that list proxies which simply link to that unlawful content. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Google has spaffed more cash on lobbying this year than Big Cable
Don't worry, it'll be cheaper when they use drones
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?