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Pirate Bay ties up in Peru

You can take our domain name but you cannae take our IP ADDRESS

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Notorious bittorrent tracker The Pirate Bay has moved again, taking up residence in Peru.

Previously housed in the .ac domain assigned to Ascension Island, the service has moved itself to the .pe namespace.

As ever, there's some obfuscation going on here, as the IP address associated with the site – 194.71.107.27 – is reported by Geobytes to point to the Italian city of Udine. Another geolocation service thinks the Bay's in Sweden.

The move wasn't unexpected: the service last week blogged that “We are now at http://thepiratebay.ac but that won't last for long, we'll soon be on our way to the next.”

That next turns out to be Peru, where the domain is regulated by an outfit called “Red Cientifica Peruana” that allows three registrars to go about their business. One of those registrars, Lamaula.pe (The Mule), seems to have a bit of a leftist bent that matches The Pirate Bay's ideology.

The new domain is the site's fifth this year, as legal strife has seen it move on from .ac, .sx, Greenland's .gl and Iceland's .is. ®

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