Feeds

Ghosts of Christmas Past: Ten tech treats from yesteryear

The kit we wanted but Santa never brought. Bastard.

Security for virtualized datacentres

Apple QuickTake 150 (1995)

Reg Hardware retro numbers

Apple’s QuickTake 150 wasn’t the first consumer digital camera, or even Apple’s first. Looking more like a hi-tech pair of binoculars of the kind Luke Skywalker might use to seek out roving R2 units than a traditional camera, it hooked up to both Mac and Windows computers via a serial link.

There was no screen to view the eight – eight! – 640 x 480 resolution pictures of a happy festive gatherings that it could store - no memory cards here – but at least it was an improvement on waiting for the chemist’s shop to open.

Set the resolution to QVGA and you could store almost as many photos as a roll of film.

A year later you’d have been able to demand a Kodak DC-50 instead, which had a PC Card slot for storage, even if it didn’t save JPEGs.

Not a commercial success, and canned by Steve Jobs on his return to Apple, the QuickTake 150 was, however briefly, a desirable gift to find under the tree, and the ideal way to take photos you could upload to brand new services like Geocities or share with other people via CompuServe, Cix or AOL.

 

Handspring Visor Deluxe (1999)

Reg Hardware retro numbers

The original Palm Pilot quickly became a popular product with both techies and business people. The one-button data sync with a desktop computer made keeping things up to date easily, and it spurred the development of mobile apps long before smartphones captured the public’s imagination.

Palm’s founders, though, weren’t happy with the direction of the company under new owner 3Com, and left to found Handspring. In 1999 they unveiled their first effort: the Visor Deluxe.

Handspring Visor Deluxe

Source: Nicole Hennig

With its iMac-inspired translucent plastic it wasn’t just a cheaper, prettier and USB-equipped competitor to the Palm III. Round the back, a “Springboard” expansion slot promised simple upgrades, including not just memory but software and other peripherals too.

The VisorPhone plug-in, launched in 2001, turned the Visor into a GSM mobile phone, with integration between the built in contacts and the phone – effectively a prototype of the later Treo smartphones a full year before Nokia’s first Symbian smartphone, and six years before the iPhone. Other modules included remote controls, GPS, cameras and recorders. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate
Belay that toil, me hearty, and park your scurvy backside
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Lumia rebrand begins: Nokia's new UK web home is Microsoft.com
Yarr, them Nokia logos walking the plank and into the drink
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.