Feeds

Microsoft: Here, we'll make it easy for you Gmail lot. Meet our Outlook.com movers

Heavy lifting, done

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Microsoft is opening a new front against Gmail with a special moving service to lure Gmailers to Redmond's relaunched Outlook.com email service

Redmond today announced new functionality in Outlook.com that it claimed would take the heavy lifting and hard work out of abandoning Gmail for Microsoft's service.

Microsoft's Naoto Sunagawa said the service would connect to your Gmail account via OAuth and auto-import both your emails and your contacts.

According to Sunagawa, the service will preserve the read/unread status of your emails while also letting you set up your Gmail account as a "send-only" account.

Sunagawa wrote on the Microsoft Office blog:

Even if you are frustrated with your current provider, the thought of switching to a new service can seem daunting. So we've introduced new functionality right into Outlook.com that does the heavy lifting for you.

The feature was announced with support from a market-research survey paid for by Microsoft which – surprise – found one in four consumers would switch email providers if the move was easier. And that, shockingly, found users wanted a service that offered those very same features sported by the new-look Outlook.com.

According to Microsoft there's "growing frustration with outdated email services." Gmail, he's looking at you.

It's Redmond's latest shot at Gmail, building on the stop-it-Microsoft-you're-embarrassing-yourself Scoogled campaign.

However, it comes at a difficult time for Outlook.com, which has been challenged from the beginning.

The predecessor to Outlook.com was Hotmail, which had been the internet's most popular free email service with a regular 350 million active accounts.

However, Microsoft converted Hotmail into Outlook with new design and new features during a six-week migration that rolled out early last year.

Now, it seems as if Gmail is number one with 425 million active accounts versus what Microsoft claims is "more than" 400 million such accounts for Outlook.

Last year's migration did not go smoothly, either, and users complained of being unable to access their accounts. Since then, there have been outages: one massive crash lasted three days during the summer - it also took out Skydrive. Microsoft blamed this on a caching problem.

Online ads in Outlook.com are losing money. Microsoft's online ads revenue fell during its fiscal first quarter by 13 per cent. Microsoft said this was because of a decline in Outlook.com advertising revenue. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.