Feeds

'Mixed tech' NBN needs a super-sized HFC net

Costs will blow out, 2016 delivery a dream

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Even to miss its original cost targets and 2016 deadline, the federal government's “mixed technology” National Broadband Network is going to require a significant expansion of the subscriber capacity of the country's HFC networks, the NBN strategic review has found.

The report (PDF) shows that the new government's forecasting capacity is almost as good as its predecessor's: rather than the $AU29.5 billion of the then-opposition's estimate, the mix of fibre, twisted pair and HFC delivery will need $AU41 billion.

Neither is there joy on the project timing, with the review finding that the 2016 deadline for “25 Mbps to all Australians” is unrealistic, and the 2019 targets are similarly unachievable.

The government now says that by 2016, 43 percent of Australians will have access to its 25 Mbps services, with 91 percent to receive 50 Mbps by 2019, and between 65 and 75 percent to reach 100 Mbps services by 2019. At completion, it says its network will comprise 26 percent fibre-to-the-premises, 44 percent fibre to the node, and 30 percent HFC connections.

That would represent a significant expansion of HFC connectivity. If there are 11 million households by 2020, HFC connections would exceed 3 million – which would mean significant upgrades to the HFC infrastructure so it would be able to service such a high proportion of its footprint.

Currently, 1.3 million premises are passed by HFC networks but are unserviced (that is, have no coax lead-in). The report notes that nodes would have to be split, equipment upgraded, and technology upgraded to accommodate those users as well as the ability to deliver 50 Mbps by 2019.

It's worth nothing that customers within the HFC footprint, but currently connected to DSL (generally for servicability reasons) are not promised an upgrade.

While not discussing the cost of copper remediation, NBN Co chair Ziggy Switkowski told the Australian Broadcasting Corporations “The World Today” programme that the company will conducting tests “from virtually every cabinet in the country” (about 70,000 as far as The Register is aware) to check the state of the copper.

The Register would have had a more detailed analysis of the strategic review, but was somehow excluded from the budget-style lock-up held today for the release of the review. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.