Feeds

Teary-eyed snappers recall the golden age of film

How digital kicked football-sized grain into touch

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Interview For those readers with a tendency to get teary-eyed over the golden age of film, and the days before digital swept physical photographic media into the cutting room bin of history, we're delighted to take a trip down memory lane today with professional photographer Phil Houghton.

Portrait of Phil Houghton holding mighty Nikon

Lock up your daughters: Phil Houghton

Phil's based in Faversham, Kent, and a long-time mucker of my brother Ash, who also lives in that sun-dappled corner of the Garden of England.

Panoramic view of Faversham's market square by Phil Houghton

Faversham's market square: A Phil Houghton panorama

Accordingly, when I was visiting my dear old bruv, I took the opportunity to chat with Phil about just how things have changed since he was a bright-eyed snapper. So, with a box of man-sized tissues handy lest tales of 35mm film prove too lachrimose, read on...

Lester: What are you up to these days?

Phil: A bit of this and a bit of that.... used to be mainly press but now I've turned to more commercial ventures as papers turn to more reader generated (digital) content. So, nowadays it's mainly commercial, corporate, industrial and public relations imagery

Lester: Is "reader generated", a euphemism for "stolen from Instagram and Facebook"?

Phil: Image nicking is pretty much all over the place now. I've just googled my name and immediately found two of my images on a national paper's "pictures of the day" site that they've not paid for - which are also on another site credited to that paper with my name.

Lester: It appears press snappers are pretty well doomed to extinction. What do you think?

Pilot atop sinking vintage aircraft

The future of press photography? Pic by Phil from his B&W days

Phil: I don't think snappers are generally doomed. There'll always be a place for quality images - sports, news, fashion, etc. I'd challenge anyone to do a football match under shitty lighting in a snowstorm on an iPhone.

Lester: How did you first get into photography?

Phil: I bought myself a Yashica FR when I was still (failing) at school. My art teacher at the time convinced me that I had a more photographic eye. Crap with a brush basically.

The front cover of the Yashika FR manual

Vintage: The Yashika FR

So I picked my camera up and went out and started doing a bit. Colour then - processed by Truprint - and you'd have to wait weeks to get your images back, invariably the majority covered in advisory stickers. Stuck with it and eventually got the hang of it.

Blurred photo with photo lab advisory sticker

We've all been there

Lester: What was your first press camera?

Phil: My father bought me a Canon A-1 - the nuts back then. I saved up for a motor drive, I think it did 2.5 frames a second, I thought it looked the bollocks. My mother had a Canon AE-1, but she also had a 70-210mm f4 lens - not for long. So my kit was the camera and two lenses. I was working at Customs and Excise when a job came up at the local rag.

The Canon A-1

The Canon A-1

Lester: You "borrowed" a 70-210mm lens from your dear old ma? I assume this is how the more aggressive paparazzi get started...

Phil: My poor old Ma's probably still got that zoom somewhere. She could never get on with it, so better in my kit bag than hers. You can't let these things go to waste.

Lester: Well quite. So, you pitched to the local paper?

Phil: I'd taught myself processing by then, went for the job with a hastily prepared portfolio, mostly shells, stones and bits of dead seagull on the beach at Dover and got the job. Convinced my mother that I need a pro camera and blagged her into purchasing me a Canon F-1, with the motor drive, battery packs and all the extras. A true beast of a machine. Manual focus and a proper work-out whenever you picked it up.

The Pentax LX and Canon F-1

Little and large: The Pentax LX and Canon F-1

Lester: I had a rather lighter Pentax LX, so less of a workout but still manual focus and all that malarkey. Autofocus is pretty advanced these days, but can you see any advantage of the old ways?

Phil: When you think back you were pretty much a multi tasking machine! Trying to focus, twiddle the shutter speed dial and turn the aperture ring to balance the little bouncing viewfinder needle. I don't miss all that. The advances in the digital world, whilst making the job easier, and opening the up the magic of photography to a whole host of new "pros", has also made the whole process somewhat more creative.

Black and white image by Phil of police battling protesters

Those were the days: Phil gets close to the action with B&W film

Lester: I assume you did your own devving?

Phil: Those days on the paper we were using FP4 and HP5, manically devving it all up in a sweat box darkroom placed at the top of the building. No ventilation and film and paper driers permanently on the go.

Crying girl being comforted by a woman

Please don't send me back to the darkroom, mummy. Early press snap by Phil

You had some idea what was going to pop out of the fix (as well as the skin off your fingers) that was the whole thing back in the day. As a snapper you knew pretty much what was doing to be on your roll of film. In those days we had to wait to see how badly we'd fucked it up. Now it's instant.

Lester: The old photographic pub bore chestnut: Fuji versus Kodak. What's your preference?

Phil's snap of Edward Heath

Oh no, they're going to bang on about Fuji versus Kodak. Edward Heath by Phil

Phil: I was a Fujifilm man myself, and still to this day use my [Fujifilm FinePix] X100 set to Astia, just love the feel of the "old film" look.

Lester: Yeah, I see the X100 has a standard Provia setting too - my transparency film of choice. How convincing are the results in imitating film?

Phil: I'll send you some examples: subtle,...

Snap of chains and leaves on the Fujifilm FinePix X100 Astia setting

The Fuji X100's Astia setting

Snap of chains and leaves on the Fujifilm FinePix X100 Provia setting

Imitation Provia on the X100

Snap of chains and leaves on the Fujifilm FinePix X100 Velvia setting

The X100 does a quick Velvia

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Bond villains lament as Wicked Lasers withdraw death ray
Want to arm that shark? Better get in there quick
Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers
Windmills, solar, tidal - all a 'false hope', say Stanford PhDs
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
SEX BEAST SEALS may be egging each other on to ATTACK PENGUINS
Boffin: 'I think the behaviour is increasing in frequency'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
The next big thing in medical science: POO TRANSPLANTS
Your brother's gonna die, kid, unless we can give him your, well ...
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.