Feeds

EMC on XtremIO SSD brickup ballsup: Its LIFETIME downtime is under 3 minutes

Replace a failed X-Brick SSD once every 5 years

Top three mobile application threats

No DOAs here: EMC’s XTremIO arrays are expected to have less than three minutes downtime in their rated life, with X-Brick component SSDs failing once every five years or so.

We have reported that the DOA rate was too high and the co-founder and general manager of EMC's acquired XtremIO business, Ehud Rokach, has written blog which is partly a counter to that, writing that our “article presented speculations that may lead to false conclusions.”

He says that, using data obtained by monitoring “hundreds of XtremIO X-Bricks at customer sites globally and across all major verticals”:

  • XtremIO delivers world class 99.9999 per cent (six nines) field-proven availability (less than 32 Seconds of unavailability in a year, and less than 3 minutes of unavailability over the lifetime of the product.)
  • Our SSD Mean Time Between Part Replacement (MTBPR) was field-measured to be 922,240 hours, or 105 years.
  • Our Annual Replacement Rate (ARR) for SSDs was field-measured to be 0.009. For an entire X-Brick (holding 25 SSDs), the probability of encountering SSD failure at any time during a 1-year period equals (1-0.991^25), or 0.2.
  • A 0.2 ARR means that on average, based on our actual field data, you’ll need to replace a failed SSD (Due to a non-endurance related failure. …) in an X-Brick roughly once every 5 years.

Pretty darn convincing. He hammers away: “Our actual measured field performance demonstrates exceptional SSD and array-level reliability. Since initiating XtremIO’s Directed Availability program we have seen a grand total of single-digit SSD failures out of thousands of deployed SSDs.”

To refresh your memory, in the comment we reproduced from Xtremio chief techie Robin Ren, he said: “I am not too happy about our field hardware failure rate for many reasons. However, the vast majority of failures – we have seen over 150 X-Bricks so far – [pauses] in real customer environments … [and] another 200 systems internally. I think we have seen a lot of DOAs in terms of drives.”

Ren spoke in October by the way, several months after Directed Availability started.

Rokach says our story, based on Ren’s comments, “referenced (unknowingly) a couple of early DOA SSD failure events during Beta, prior to product being released for Directed Availability. The two failures during pre-release Beta were analysed, and corrective action applied (firmware update). Not surprisingly, ever since we started Directed Availability and to this very day, we have seen no excess SSD failures of any kind (in the field or DOA). This is indeed a non-issue.”

Happy to hear it. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.