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Google makes Compute Engine official

Googlified VMs now run SUSE or RHEL on up to 16 cores with 99.95% SLA

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Google has cut the ribbon on its Compute Engine, bringing it into the world of virtual machines by the hour and into combat with the likes of Amazon Web Services, Rackspace and VMware.

Google's been talking up the Compute Engine for a while now, recently teasing on the topic of automatic failover for virtual machines. But everything still had The Chocolate Factory's BETA stamp on it.

That changed today with the emission of a blog post saying the service is now ready for prime time.

The service has also been expanded a bit, with Google saying its now ready to offer VMs running “any out-of-the-box Linux distribution (including SELinux and CoreOS) as well as any kernel or software you like, including Docker, FOG, xfs and aufs.” Support for SUSE and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (albeit in limited preview) is another addition. That's rather a step up from the CentOS and Debian previously available.

There's also a new 16-virtual-core instance with 30 GB of memory if you're so inclined.

Google says it has 1,000 people working on the cloud service and that their days are spent toiling on Google's own infrastructure as well as the bits used to run Compute Engine.

Uptime of 99.95 per cent uptime is offered under a new service level agreement.

The Chocolate Factory also appears to have spent up on flash storage, promising that “the largest Persistent Disk volumes have up to 700% higher peak I/O capability”. There's another post here explaining the storage arrangements.

The Reg's Kid Cloud Jack Clark is working on a pricing comparison of the major clouds and analysis of Google's announcements, which include a ten per cent price cut to all its instance types. Don't touch that dial! ®

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