Feeds

Chinese prof brands gamers no better than drug dealers

'Spiritual narcotics' enslave youth and leave them in a stupour

Security for virtualized datacentres

A Chinese newspaper has managed to offend most of the nation’s gaming community by quoting an addiction “expert” who likened gamers to drug dealers.

Guangdong-based Communist Party mouthpiece the Southern Daily spoke to a “distinguished” university professor Tao Hongkai for the rent-a-quote outburst, in a piece of reporting obviously designed to warn people off playing online games for money.

He claimed that some online gamers end up either extremely fat or emaciated, highlighting the terrible truth that such pursuits can erode the bodies and lives of players.

The academic then claimed that studies had proven the following (tr GamesInAsia):

The damage that violent web games do to players’ brains is like the influence of opium on the brain of an addict; this shows that violent web games are internet opium, spiritual narcotics. Earning a living playing web games is like being a drug dealer; this way of living can only harm others and harm yourself.

As GamesInAsia points out, Tao has tried to add emotional resonance to his words by neatly slipping in a reference to a dark part of China’s history. The so-called “century of humiliation” was begun by Western colonisers, and in particular the British, who defeated China in the Opium Wars of the 1800s.

The fightback against Tao’s misplaced words has already begun, however, with leading Chinese gaming company Netease using the the academic’s new-found notoriety to market its own wares.

This is not to say that gaming addiction isn’t real or that Middle Kingdom hasn’t got it bad, of course.

China was one of the first country’s to countries in the world to recognise this very modern affliction as an illness and has a nationwide network of much-feared internet addiction treatment centres.

In one such centre a 15-year-old boy died after severed “therapeutic” beatings – leading to a crack down on physical violence at such facilities. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate
Belay that toil, me hearty, and park your scurvy backside
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Your chance to WIN the WORLD'S ONLY HANDHELD ZX SPECTRUM
Reg staff not allowed to enter, god dammit
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.