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Facebook's Zuckerberg: US gov 'blew it' on mass surveillance

By all means MINE THAT DATA, just tell us about it... bitch

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Facebook supremo Mark Zuckerberg - whose company is routinely criticised for its dubious data-mining practices - has attacked the US government for being secretive about its online spying activities.

"I think the government really blew it on this one. And I honestly think that they're continuing to blow it in some ways and I hope that they become more transparent in that part of it," he told ABC News.

Zuck argued that a balance was needed to allow American citizens to live in a safe country where they are protected by spooks while, at the same time, being kept in the loop about mass surveillance - something the Facebook chief arguably knows a thing or two about.

"In terms of doing the right things and also being clear and telling people about what you're doing," the flame-haired, sneaker-wearing billionaire said in reference to the NSA/PRISM scandal that was leaked by master blabbermouth and erstwhile US government IT contractor Edward Snowden.

Zuckerberg said during the TV interview that he was continuing to lobby for more visas for highly skilled workers to keep them Stateside. He described the immigration issue in the US as "one of the biggest civil rights issues of our time".

He added: "There are 11 million undocumented people living in this country."

When quizzed about the view held by some in the US that those individuals are breaking the law, Zuck disagreed and said many immigrants without the right paperwork wanted to "contribute".

"The future of our economy is a knowledge economy. And that means that getting the most talented people into this country is the most important thing that we can do to make sure that the companies of tomorrow are founded here," he said. ®

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