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Jury: Samsung must cough $290m of $379m Apple wanted - NOT in 5 cent pieces

'Always been about more than patents and money'

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After three days of deliberation, the jury in Apple's patent fight with Samsung has determined that the South Korean chaebol will have to pay Cupertino $290m in damages and lost profits after pinching its designs.

"For Apple, this case has always been about more than patents and money. It has been about innovation and the hard work that goes into inventing products that people love," Apple told El Reg in a statement. "While it's impossible to put a price tag on those values, we are grateful to the jury for showing Samsung that copying has a cost."

The result will be a bit of a disappointment for both sides. Apple was asking for $379.8m, while Samsung wanted pay $52.7m to settle the case. The verdict now means Samsung owes Apple $929m for copying its designs, after Judge Lucy Koh slashed an initial judgment of $1.05bn against Samsung down to an eventual $639m after various arguments from both sides.

On Thursday, the six-woman, two-man jury found that 13 Samsung phones and fondleslabs infringed on Apple's patents, and scored off each one with a specific amount of damages. Samsung's Infuse 4G cost it almost $100m, the jury found, with the Droid Charge's damages set at $60m and change.

A last-ditch attempt by Samsung to stop the trial on Wednesday failed, when Judge Koh ruled that the proceedings weren't going to wait to see if one of Apple's patents, covering scrolling and bouncing of a user-interface object on a touchscreen, might be ruled invalid.

Apple isn’t done with Samsung yet, there's another trial due next year for the infringement of other patents and the tide does seem to be flowing in Apple's favor. Samsung better try to shift a lot more smartphones if it's going to pay its bills. ®

Bootnote

Curious about the 5c pieces in the headline? A famous (untrue) internet meme claimed that Samsung had paid some court fine to Apple in the form of many truckloads of nickels.

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