Feeds

From Dept of REALLY? Sueball lobbed at Apple over crap iOS Maps app

Landmark stuffups? That's it: I sue in the morn

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A fangurl has launched a class action suit on behalf of everyone who had thought the iPhone was an unfailingly accurate navigational tool and was accordingly disappointed with the quality of Apple's iOS Maps app.

Nancy Romine Minkler has brought the ever-so-slightly ridiculous case against Apple for its failures during the rollout of iOS Maps.

In a legal filing, Minkler's lawyer wrote: "The Apple Devices at issue are not fit for its advertised purpose of providing a product that contains a Map function which accurately directs the user to the desired destination, accurately depicts landmarks etc."

Most fanbois will wince at the memory of various Apple Maps stuffups: while the iOS6 incarnation messed up maps of locations outside major cities, an infamous cockup on the iOS7 Maps app meant people were directed into the path of oncoming planes.

The suit hinges on seven causes of action. The first attacks Apple's claims that its "devices were free of defects in materials and workmanship".

Despite Apple's returns policy and the existence of software updates, the filing continues: "Defendant has breached its warranty obligations by not agreeing to refund the purchase price of the Apple devices to dissatisfied customers and not agreeing to replace without charge all flawed Apple Maps applications."

Another cause outlined in the filing was a claim that iDevices were not sold in "merchantable condition" due to the app flaw, while other causes touch on "unfair competition" and "misleading advertising".

"Plaintiff and members of the Class would not have purchased the Apple Devices and/or would not have paid as much for them if Apple disclosed that the above representations were false and if there were aware that Apple Maps would not provide public transit directions, would mislabel restaurants, landmarks, streets, etc, and provide inaccurate directions," the filing continued.

Apple has not yet commented on the case. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.