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From Dept of REALLY? Sueball lobbed at Apple over crap iOS Maps app

Landmark stuffups? That's it: I sue in the morn

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A fangurl has launched a class action suit on behalf of everyone who had thought the iPhone was an unfailingly accurate navigational tool and was accordingly disappointed with the quality of Apple's iOS Maps app.

Nancy Romine Minkler has brought the ever-so-slightly ridiculous case against Apple for its failures during the rollout of iOS Maps.

In a legal filing, Minkler's lawyer wrote: "The Apple Devices at issue are not fit for its advertised purpose of providing a product that contains a Map function which accurately directs the user to the desired destination, accurately depicts landmarks etc."

Most fanbois will wince at the memory of various Apple Maps stuffups: while the iOS6 incarnation messed up maps of locations outside major cities, an infamous cockup on the iOS7 Maps app meant people were directed into the path of oncoming planes.

The suit hinges on seven causes of action. The first attacks Apple's claims that its "devices were free of defects in materials and workmanship".

Despite Apple's returns policy and the existence of software updates, the filing continues: "Defendant has breached its warranty obligations by not agreeing to refund the purchase price of the Apple devices to dissatisfied customers and not agreeing to replace without charge all flawed Apple Maps applications."

Another cause outlined in the filing was a claim that iDevices were not sold in "merchantable condition" due to the app flaw, while other causes touch on "unfair competition" and "misleading advertising".

"Plaintiff and members of the Class would not have purchased the Apple Devices and/or would not have paid as much for them if Apple disclosed that the above representations were false and if there were aware that Apple Maps would not provide public transit directions, would mislabel restaurants, landmarks, streets, etc, and provide inaccurate directions," the filing continued.

Apple has not yet commented on the case. ®

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