Feeds

First 3D map of Great Barrier Reef created – still can't find Nemo

German/Australia satellite bathymetry project dives deep, maps 30m below surface

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

German company EOMAP and researchers from Australia's James Cook University and University of Queensland have produced the first underwater map of the Great Barrier Reef.

The 2600-km long collection of reefs is world heritage listed, a colossal tourist magnet and also an increasingly important – and contentious – shipping route. While the reef has been extensively mapped, no comprehensive digital data set of its features had previously been created.

The new maps, some of which can be seen in the promotional video below, cover 350,000 km2 of the reef and nearby areas. Importantly, they also offer 3D representations of the reef to a depth of 30 metres.

To create the maps, EOMAP and James Cook boffins relied on satellite bathymetry, a technique that analyses the wavelengths of light present in satellite photography to allow interpretation of water depth. Once processed, the results look like the image below. EOMAP has also posted this video offering another look at the maps.

EOMAP's new 3D map of the Great Barrier Reef

Where's Nemo? Pixar's famous fish isn't quite visible on EOMAP's new 3D version of the Great Barrier Reef

The resulting dataset is now a commercial product that, sadly, has a $US500 minimum purchase. EOMAP will probably find buyers at that price, as Professor Stuart Phinn of the University of Queensland, another partner on the project, decrees in the canned statement announcing the project that "This information is regarded as essential for any government or company involved with managing the reef environment.”

With Australia more than keen on keeping the reef in good health so tourists continue to flock there, and miners hoping to send more coal-laden ships to Asia on routes that pass through or close to the reef, buyers should not be hard to come by. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
SCREW YOU, Russia! NASA lobs $6.8bn at Boeing AND SpaceX to run space station taxis
Musk charging nearly half as much as Boeing for crew trips
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
India's MOM Mars mission makes final course correction
Mangalyaan probe will feel the burn of orbital insertion on September 24th
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.