Feeds

Rackspace catches up to Amazon... four years later: Say hi again to auto-scale

New demand-response feature is vintage Bezos tech

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Rackspace has announced the general availability of "Auto Scaling" technology for its public cloud, catching up with Amazon which implemented the tech in 2009.

Auto Scaling is a crucial component of any cloud, as it allows new resources to be allocated to live virtualized servers in real-time in response to demand, and without the need for a shutdown.

Rackspace's version has both schedule-based and event-based policies, so admins can either define time periods during which they want infrastructure to scale up, or use monitoring services to create auto-trigger events.

"Auto Scale is the easiest way to make your Rackspace Cloud react automatically to changes in the demand your users place on your application," wrote Rackspace employee J R Arredondo.

By implementing the technology, Rackspace has added another valuable feature to its public infrastructure-as-a-service cloud, but it also highlights the gulf in capability between the Texan web-hoster-turned-cloud-hustler, and Amazon Web Services, which launched the scaling tech in May 2009.

Rackspace can take solace in the fact that other major rivals, such as Microsoft via Windows Azure and Google via Compute Engine, have also been slow to implement the much-needed feature.

Microsoft announced built-in Auto Scaling in June. Google, meanwhile, has made the tech possible, but it's difficult to create and requires admins to use a broad swath of the Chocolate Factory's arcane infrastructure.

Since Amazon made Auto Scaling available on its sprawling platform several years ago, we do find ourselves wondering why it took these companies so long to implement. One possible reason is that the heavily modified Xen hypervisor used by AWS could be easier to stretch than the systems in use at Google (KVM) and Microsoft (Hyper-V). But that still doesn't explain how Rackspace (Xen), has been slow to implement the tech. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.