Feeds

NORKS breaks ground on new high-tech industrial park

That's the end for Silcon Roundabout then

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

North Korea has finally begun building a new industrial complex designed to encourage investment from hi-tech companies hailing from across the border.

The official ground-breaking for Kaesong Hi-Tech Industrial Park took place last week, according to reports from the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) spotted by the North Korea Tech blog.

“The park will have an IT centre, hotel, dwelling houses, school and other buildings, as well as a power plant,” the report claimed.

The “Peace and Economy Development Group” will take the reins – a consortium apparently comprised of firms from Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia, the Middle East and Africa.

Further details are in short supply, a common occurrence when writing about events in the Hermit Kingdom, although it’s likely that the park will be built next or close to the existing Kaesong Industrial Complex given that it is already connected to the south by road and rail.

News of the ground-breaking presumably indicates that Pyongyang has decided to tone down hostilities towards its neighbour which surfaced earlier this year, leading to the country pulling its 50,000+ workers from the Kaesong complex.

Those workers earn much less than South Korean and even Chinese workers, but do rather better than most North Koreans even if they are taxed on their earnings. Those taxes, and thos levied on companies in the economic zone, are among North Korea's few sources of income.

The economic importance of the complex to Kim Jong-un means it's not surprising operations were restarted again after a few months, in September, or that he’s now looking for a new round of investment from South Korea’s technology firms.

News of the project first surfaced last month after local reports claimed construction and design companies from Singapore and Hong Kong had been brought on board to work on the complex.

The KCNA report came at the end of an international conference on special economic zones in Pyongyang, with plans to build a toll road from Pyongyang to Capital Airport apparently also agreed. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.