Feeds

CA follows the Riverbed, hopes to find cloudy Amazon mainframe gold

We came, we saw a niche, we hope to conquer

SANS - Survey on application security programs

In a smart bit of niche identification and gap-filling, stuffy old CA Technologies is getting mainframe backup data to Amazon's cloud by going through Riverbed.

With such a nifty move anybody would think CA has new management. Guess what? It has, with new CEO Michael Gregoire spurring the company on to do better.

Start out with a backup product for System z mainframes such as CA's CA Vtape. Add a cloud storage gateway software product called CA Cloud Storage for System z. It takes mainframe backup data and uses a Riverbed Whitewater appliance to pump it up in WAN-optimised form to Amazon's S3 cloud or to its low-cost Glacier archive service.

CA is gushingly complimentary about Amazon's cloud in its release, puffing its reliability and blathering on about the advantages:

  • Cut storage costs by taking advantage of the efficiencies AWS offers such as capacity on demand and reduced dependency on storage media.
  • Speed ability to access, store, retrieve and recover storage data, increasing velocity to seconds from the hours, or days, physical media recovery can take.
  • Reduce data centre risk by storing data securely off-site, while addressing regulatory guidelines for long-term data retention.
  • Seamlessly operate with current applications that store and retrieve data without programming changes.
  • Automatically reduce storage size and network bandwidth requirements with powerful de-duplication algorithms and the number of bytes sent into the cloud.

All true, with caveats. The data access speed point is in comparison to data held on tape, of course. The "increasing velocity to seconds" point obviously doesn't apply to Glacier which has a built-in wait of hours before you get any data back.

The main selling point is to reduce local disk or tape backup data storage costs by shunting the data off up to cheaper Amazon. It's a smart move by CA. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
IBM rides nightmarish hardware landscape on OpenPOWER Consortium raft
Google mulls 'third-generation of warehouse-scale computing' on Big Blue's open chips
It's GOOD to get RAIN on your upgrade parade: Crucial M550 1TB SSD
Performance tweaks and power savings – what's not to like?
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.