Feeds

CA follows the Riverbed, hopes to find cloudy Amazon mainframe gold

We came, we saw a niche, we hope to conquer

3 Big data security analytics techniques

In a smart bit of niche identification and gap-filling, stuffy old CA Technologies is getting mainframe backup data to Amazon's cloud by going through Riverbed.

With such a nifty move anybody would think CA has new management. Guess what? It has, with new CEO Michael Gregoire spurring the company on to do better.

Start out with a backup product for System z mainframes such as CA's CA Vtape. Add a cloud storage gateway software product called CA Cloud Storage for System z. It takes mainframe backup data and uses a Riverbed Whitewater appliance to pump it up in WAN-optimised form to Amazon's S3 cloud or to its low-cost Glacier archive service.

CA is gushingly complimentary about Amazon's cloud in its release, puffing its reliability and blathering on about the advantages:

  • Cut storage costs by taking advantage of the efficiencies AWS offers such as capacity on demand and reduced dependency on storage media.
  • Speed ability to access, store, retrieve and recover storage data, increasing velocity to seconds from the hours, or days, physical media recovery can take.
  • Reduce data centre risk by storing data securely off-site, while addressing regulatory guidelines for long-term data retention.
  • Seamlessly operate with current applications that store and retrieve data without programming changes.
  • Automatically reduce storage size and network bandwidth requirements with powerful de-duplication algorithms and the number of bytes sent into the cloud.

All true, with caveats. The data access speed point is in comparison to data held on tape, of course. The "increasing velocity to seconds" point obviously doesn't apply to Glacier which has a built-in wait of hours before you get any data back.

The main selling point is to reduce local disk or tape backup data storage costs by shunting the data off up to cheaper Amazon. It's a smart move by CA. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.