Feeds

Boffins warn LIMPWARE takes the pleasure out of cloud

One flaccid node and the whole cloud goes soft

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Computer science boffins from the USA have come up with a lovely term to describe under-performing hardware: “Limpware”.

The term's not just for fun, but actually has some pretty serious implications for cloud computing because the boffins have run tests suggesting just one limp node in a cloudy cluster can lower performance of the entire rig.

Limpware's now been described in three papers. The first, Limplock: Understanding the Impact of Limpware on Scale-Out Cloud Systems (PDF) defines Limpware as “hardware whose performance degrades significantly compared to its specification.”

Plenty of hardware does that, but the authors believe the large loads imposed on clouds make it more likely that Limpware will develop. They also write that they have “collected reports that show how disk and network performance can drop by orders of magnitude” if a single piece of limpware is present in a cloud rig.

The authors term such performance hits “Limplock” and in a second paper, The Case for Limping-Hardware Tolerant Clouds (PDF) argue that “current systems fail to properly manage limping hardware, and thus performance failures often cascade.”

A third paper, Impact of Limpware on HDFS: A Probabilistic Estimation (PDF) offers a detailed analysis of how a single limplocked component, in this case a single NIC card, can greatly degrade the performance of a Hadoop cluster. The paper also shows that Hadoop can't detect the under-performing NIC and therefore doesn't fail over to another. The two other papers offer similar evidence for performance hits and failure to detect limplocked components in HBase, Cassandra, and ZooKeeper.

The three papers collectivity call for more studies of limpware and limplock, so that cloud software can be built to work around the problem.

Those suggestions appear rock solid. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.