Feeds

Hey, is that CSI: Hackers on TV? Oh, it's Microsoft's Cybercrime Center

If in doubt, get the flashy, expensive 20ft video wall out

The essential guide to IT transformation

Microsoft has built a new home for its Digital Crimes Unit on its Redmond campus to bring together geeks, lawyers, forensic specialists, and law enforcement in tracking down online crooks around the world.

Microsoft Cybercrime Center

No fighting in the war room please

"The Microsoft Cybercrime Center is where our experts come together with customers and partners to focus on one thing: keeping people safe online," said David Finn, associate general counsel of the Microsoft DCU in a statement. "By combining sophisticated tools and technology with the right skills and new perspectives, we can make the Internet safer for everyone."

The 100-person team will be augmented by third-party companies and police who will be able to use the facilities for investigations into crime on a 24/7 basis. While the bulk of the investigations going on will be chasing criminals attacking Microsoft products or customers, the center has a wider remit to work with Interpol and other law enforcement operations on global threats.

Microsoft forensics center

Microsoft's forensic center team at work

"In the fight against cybercrime the public sector significantly benefits from private sector expertise, such as provided by Microsoft," Noboru Nakatani, executive director of the Interpol Global Complex for Innovation said.

"The security community needs to build on its coordinated responses to keep pace with today's cybercriminals. The Microsoft Cybercrime Center will be an important hub in accomplishing that task more effectively and proactively."

Included in the new center is a digital forensics laboratory for examining clues in software and hardware, a secure evidence room, a dedicated anti-malware research center, office space for visiting cops and specialists, and a control center containing a wall of touch-screens showing new attacks as they pop up. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
Think crypto hides you from spooks on Facebook? THINK AGAIN
Traffic fingerprints reveal all, say boffins
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.