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Apple wants $380m for patents, Samsung says $52m. Get a room, you two

Or can't anyone pry rounded rectangles from the lawyers' cold, clammy hands?

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Apple and Samsung kicked off the next phase of their high-profile patent infringement case with the two sides far apart on their damage estimates.

Presenting at the San Jose district court yesterday, lawyers from both companies put forward their proposals for just how valuable the Apple patents which Samsung infringed upon were worth.

According to a Reuters report from the courthouse, Apple has estimated that it is owed roughly $380m for damages, while attorneys for Samsung argued that it should have to pay the Cupertino behemoth just $52m.

The hearing marks the latest episode in the long-running saga over allegations of patent infringement between Apple and Samsung. The two companies continue to argue over just how much money the Korean firm should pay out after a jury sided in Apple's favor last year.

At the heart of the matter is the decision on just how much of an original $1bn legal award Apple will be able to claim. Judge Lucy Koh had originally reduced the payment by some $450m after findings of jury misconduct arose.

The case is the latest in what has become a long and costly legal campaign for both sides over the legality of the Android operating system. Apple, driven by a belief of founder and longtime-CEO Steve Jobs that its own iOS brand had been blatantly stolen by Google and its partners, has doggedly pursued legal actions against Samsung and other vendors, going so far as to ask for blocks on the sale of infringing products.

That battle could carry on even further in the coming years, as Apple was recently granted a patent which could prove critical in its future legal campaigns against its mobile rivals. ®

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