Feeds

Sysadmins forced to CLEAN UP after bosses WATCH SMUT at work

Security dunces in the C-suite handing IT all sorts of sticky problems

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Oops: according to a malware study from ThreatTrack Security, “visiting a pornographic Website” is one of the top four reasons that companies' “senior leadership team” members cop malware infections.

The study talked not to the victim companies, but to 200 malware analysts that had worked for infected companies. They found that in spite of their customers complaining about a lack of security resources, executives were still happy to behave like complete berks when it comes to security, with the following common sources of infection:

  • Clicking on a malicious link in a phishing email (56 per cent)
  • Attached an infected device to a PC (47 per cent)
  • Allowing a family member to use a company-owned device (45 per cent)
  • Visiting a pornographic website (40 per cent)
  • Installing a malicious mobile app (33 per cent).

If that sounds like the C-suite's been fishing in the shallow end of the gene pool, it gets worse. In spite of data disclosure laws in America, the study found that “more than half of the malware analysts surveyed said they have investigated or addressed a data breach that the company did not disclose to customers, partners or other stakeholders”.

Let's just check that again: executives do dumb things that compromise network security, and resist disclosing that they did dumb things that compromised network security...

Most companies – more than 86 per cent – responding to the study have an incident response team, which is a good thing considering the varied and stupid ways the net-sec bods have to defend against their executives' stupidity.

While the analysts are either confident or boastful about their capabilities, with 45 per cent saying they could analyse a malware sample in between one and two hours, two-thirds of the respondents also put the “complexity of attacks” as one of their two greatest challenges (alongside the volume of attacks). ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.